Aug 22
bookish:

 

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Aug 21

Well, it’s back to school time, and you know what THAT means—the little monsters will be out of your hair for a while.  Time for them to hit the books again.  Well, not really.  Why would anybody want to hit a book?  What did a book ever do to YOU?  Anyway, happy back to school, and thanks for sharing my books with your children.

Ten ways to increase your reading speed:

1. Take a speed reading class.

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2. Only read every other word. 

3. Skip any word that has the letter “A” in it.  There are 25 other letters.  How important could one lousy letter be?

4. When you sit down to read, pretend a meteor is about to strike the earth and you have one hour to live. 

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5. Take another speed reading class, because you didn’t learn anything the first time.

6. Only read “Hop On Pop” by Dr. Seuss. 

7. Exercise your eyes by watching ping-pong tournaments. 

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8. When you come to a word you don’t understand, don’t waste time looking it up.  Just substitute the word “shoebox.”

9. Get some of your reading done at odd times, like while you’re skydiving.

10. Take another speed reading class.

More of Dan’s wise words can be found in his books for kids, including My Weird School and The Genius Files.

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Aug 20

nprbooks:

More NPR staffers respond to intern Nicole’s survey about their favorite books from when they were kids that still speak to them as grown-ups:

Code Switch’s Karen Grigsby Bates wrote in about The Big Jump by Benjamin Elkin: 

[A] fairy tale in which a king bets a little boy he cannot jump the 500 or so steps to his throne. The little boy accepts the challenge — then proceeds to reach the throne by jumping up several steps. The king at first is affronted, but when reminded he didn’t specify HOW the distance be conquered, just THAT it be conquered, he agreed and paid up. Moral to me: difficult, seemingly impossible tasks can be achieved in small steps. Or jumps.

Arts correspondent Mandalit Del Barco says:

L. Frank Baum’s “Oz” books! I still have the entire series, which I’ll pass on to my daughter. The series got me dreaming about adventure travel, whimsical fantasy, and going over the rainbow, but also taught me “there’s no place like home.”

Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird had a lasting impact on Carline Watson, head of NPR’s brand new Identity and Culture unit:

I read it aged around 12 or 13 and was so outraged by the injustice suffered by Tom Robinson and his family. I read it from time to time and it reminds me of how little and yet how much has changed.

Arts editor Deborah George says Phillis Garrard’s Jenny’s Secret Island is a great read for a 10-year-old girl:

I came across this obscure book one day in the library when I was about 10.  It was written in 1943.  It’s about a young girl whose parents are both poets, nice but absentminded and they let her alone a lot of the time.  One day she gets fed up with school and just walks out of the classroom…she finds a boat and paddles out to a tiny island where she makes camp.   Won’t tell you the ending.
 
I wanted to BE Jenny (especially the walking out of school part).  She was fierce but self-possessed.  

Arts producer Mallory Yu wrote in with The Phantom Tollbooth by Norton Juster:

It taught me … how much joy and playfulness and discovery the English language could bring. Also: “So many things are possible, just as long as you don’t know they’re impossible.” And “you often learn more by being wrong for the right reasons than you do by being right for the wrong reasons.”

And finally, Five Children and It by E. Nesbit taught team member Lidia Jean Kott how to wake up without an alarm clock. Here are the steps — which actually work, according to Lidia Jean — laid out in the story:

You get into bed at night … and lie down quite flat on your little back with your hands straight down by your sides. Then you say ‘I must wake up at five’ (or six, or seven, or eight, or nine, or whatever the time is that you want), and as you say it you push your chin down on to your chest and then bang your head back on the pillow. And you do this as many times as there are ones in the time you want to wake up at. (It is quite an easy sum.)

(via harperperennial)

Aug 19
Another panel from THE GRAVEYARD BOOK GRAPHIC NOVEL: VOLUME 1 by neil-gaiman
Chapter Two ExcerptIllustrated by P. Craig Russell

Another panel from THE GRAVEYARD BOOK GRAPHIC NOVEL: VOLUME 1 by neil-gaiman

Chapter Two Excerpt
Illustrated by P. Craig Russell

Aug 18

Time and time again, we find passages and quotes in our books that stand alone, outside of the story. Quotes that move/inspire/teach/humor/touch us. Quotes that have us saying “Write that down!” 

We want to share those moments with you.

And to kick it off, here are a few of our favorite quotes from The One and Only Ivan by Katherine Applegate:

Memories are precious … they help tell us who we are.

Humans waste words. They toss them like banana peels and leave them to rot. Everyone knows the peels are the best part.

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I like colorful tales with black beginnings and stormy middles and cloudless blue-sky endings. But any story will do.

With enough time, you can get used to almost anything.

Human can surprise you sometimes. An unpredictable species, Homo sapiens.

What are some of your favorite quotes from the Newbery Medal winner

Aug 16
Who’s ready for a new Pinkalicious hue? Sign up for the Pinka newsletter for more updates on the series!

Who’s ready for a new Pinkalicious hue? 
Sign up for the Pinka newsletter for more updates on the series!

Aug 15
A new Pete the Cat book is here! 

A new Pete the Cat book is here! 

Aug 14
A friendly reminder.
Illustrated by Booki Vivat

A friendly reminder.

Illustrated by Booki Vivat

Aug 13
A sneak peek inside THE GRAVEYARD BOOK Graphic Novel by neil-gaiman. 
Chapter Two ExcerptIllustrated by P. Craig Russell

A sneak peek inside THE GRAVEYARD BOOK Graphic Novel by neil-gaiman

Chapter Two Excerpt
Illustrated by P. Craig Russell